BLIND MAN'S BUFF AND OTHER STORIES

BY MALCOLM JAMESON

Thrilling interplanetary adventures from Malcolm Jameson, author of "Bullard of the Space Patrol". Includes:

Blind Man's Buff - The Commission had a fine-sounding offer. Just show'em how much of Venus you wanted and it was yours. Trouble was, you had to make a map of the unmappable!
Sand - Mars is a desert world, a dry, rusted corpse of a planet. And deserts are always tricky things—but a world of shifting sand made trickier yet by shifty crooks—
Lilies of Life - There was a disease on Venus, and the natives seemed to have a cure. But the symbiosis involved was madder even than the usual madness of Venus' life-cycles—
God’s Footstool - You may have heard the Earth was round. More correctly, that it's an "oblate spheroid." But if you think that's a definite shape, or that we know the shape of the planet even, this fact article may make things a little less clear. Saying "The world's all awry" is stating a fact, not an impression!
Efficiency - A probability zero short short about those claims of increased fuel efficiency.
Soup King - The ship crashed on Venus, with a gold mine as its landing spot. Fine for everybody but the cook. But he did better—he fell in the soup!
Hobo God - It wasn't their idea, but they stumbled on the perfect ambassador to the Martians. He had a way of thinking and acting that Martians understood—
You Can't Win - When a big-time crooked gambler runs up against a space navigator's computation of curves as applied to gambling devices—he can't win!
A Question of Salvage - The salvage fleets had no place for a man with a conscience — but sometimes one showed up, and sometimes they left “junk” behind, when the ether storms were strong—
Alien Envoy - These aliens were really alien. As totally different from man as is a cactus plant. Would that difference lead to inevitable extermination war — or complete lack of conflict?
The Monster Out of Space - This was no planetoid wandering in the void. It was a living monster, threatening to eat whole worlds. Could Berol's science stop it?